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All posts tagged "chrome"


Monday, May 16, 2011

Ed Bott's Five Reasons Why Google's New Chromebook Isn't a Windows Killer

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Laptop Thoughts Articles & Resources" @ 03:00 PM

http://www.zdnet.com/blog/bott/five...ows-killer/3290

"At Google's I/O conference this week, the audience erupted into cheers when they heard the news that they were getting a free notebook powered by the Chrome OS. It's too bad that the audience was filled with developers instead of the IT pros who Google is counting on to actually buy these things. Something tells me that the latter audience would have been sitting on their hands for most of the session, and they wouldn't have been swayed by that Oprah moment."

Ed Bott comes out guns-a-blazin' against Google's Chromebook - and he has some very legitimate points. If you're an enterprise, the last thing you want is a product that gets updated immediately before you have a chance to test what impact the upgrade has on the tools your employees use. The pricing is also a big question mark - $28 a month over three years is $1008. For a consumer, that makes no sense. For a business...it depends if they can save other costs around software licensing (anti-virus, Microsoft Office), hardware replacements, and IT labour re-imaging systems that get borked. The thin-client computing dream has been around for a long time, just like the tablet dream has, but as we've seen with raging success of the iPad, when the technology reaches a certain inflection point, things can take off. Is thin-client computing at that stage now? I guess we'll see!


Friday, April 1, 2011

Whose Browser Will Reign Supreme?

Posted by Hooch Tan in "Digital Home News" @ 04:00 PM

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/br...ho_new_king_web

"Our goal is to figure out which of these three is the best vehicle for navigating cyberspace. We’ll be paying particular attention to new features, security, privacy, and of course performance. We’ll even throw in a few power user tips for each one. And for those of you who roll with Opera and Safari, don’t worry, we’ll cover the latest versions of those, too. In the words of Michael Buffer, “Let’s get ready to rumble!” "

There are a lot of people that do not really care which web browser they use. It could be argued that you could change the browser on them and they would not even notice. This review is not for them. Some of us are quite picky about our browser. We like things a certain way, with certain plug-ins or features. After a while, the browser, which we probably use more than any other application at this point, becomes like a comforting friend who holds your hand while you travel through the wonderful world of the Internet. Of course, there are also times where we have second thoughts. The magic has faded and we start to find ourselves frustrated with our companion. Frequent crashes. Laggy behaviour. Rendering problems with specific websites you visit. So you eyes start to wander and look for something fresh and tasty. Then this review is right up your alley! A good overview of all the major browsers (admittedly only for Windows users) lets you taste each one before you commit to a new relationship. Personally, I have been using Firefox for many, many years and it has served me well, but lately, I have been finding that it is becoming a bit bloated and taking up considerable amounts of memory. The new release of Firefox 4 may help with that. If not, I guess I will have to find something better! Do you have any preferences? What browser do you evangelize?


Sunday, January 16, 2011

Google Chooses WebM Over H.264 In HTML5

Posted by Andy Dixon in "Digital Home Software" @ 11:00 AM

http://news.cnet.com/8301-30684_3-2...g=2547-1_3-0-20

"Choosing strategies based on what you believe to be long-term benefits is generally a good idea when running a business, but if you manage to alienate the world in the process, the long term may become irrelevant. It was hard to miss the response that accompanied Google's announcement earlier this week that it no longer planned to support the H.264 codec for the HTML5 video tag in its Chrome browser in order to focus on the WebM technology. Depending on what you read, Google is either evil, brilliant, hypocritical, cunning, principled, or confused in dropping support for H.264, a widely used technology for encoding and decoding video files so they are playable on PCs and mobile devices."

This is a brave move by Google, choosing to use WebM in its Chrome browser rather than H.264 which the other browsers are planning to use. Googles reasons are based on the fact that H.264 is controlled by a group of companies called MPEG-LA which pool the patents on these codecs and the license them to people who need to use it. Google are obviously wanting to move away from using a licensed technology in it's browser for an open source one that it controls. Google acquired the WebM codec when it bought On2 Technologies in 2009, and has released WebM to the open source community. It's a brave move by Google considering how popular and well used the H.264 codec is out there, and it will be interesting to see whether companies will switch to using WebM instead.


Thursday, July 15, 2010

Who Should You Choose When You're "Just Browsing"

Posted by Hooch Tan in "Digital Home News" @ 12:00 PM

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...ari-5,2680.html

"While this is a follow-up to our original Web browser Grand Prix, we have also included some standards compliance testing along with enhanced memory benchmarks. We feel that even though these tests do not directly affect speed, they are crucial to overall performance. But don't worry, we'll separate those benchmarks from our speed tests in the conclusion, so you'll still get to find out which Web browser is the fastest when judged purely on raw speed."

Web Browsers have definitely become one of the major components of our Internet connected life. The concept is great: A single application or platform through which you can access the largest communications network and one of the largest data repositories in the world. Of course, that vision is being challenged with the rise of apps on the iPhone, Android, and Windows Phone 7 (if it ever truly comes out) but for now, it remains one of the most important parts of computing. While we all have our own preferences, I am impressed that the web browser market is a five horse race. Yes, I know there are many other browsers to choose from, but there are five web browsers that have an appreciable amount of the market. I think it just demonstrates how cut throat the market is. In many ways, it is trivial to change browsers (with the exception of extensions) and that means that each browser has to compete fiercely to stay relevant. In another year or two, we might see a different landscape altogether.


Wednesday, June 30, 2010

The Browser Wars Continue, Sort Of

Posted by Hooch Tan in "Digital Home News" @ 02:00 PM

http://lifehacker.com/5575407/brows...-opera-106-beta

"As you can see, each browser has its strengths—even the most maligned browser in recent history. We took each of the five all-browser tests—start-up times, nine-tab loading, JavaScript, DOM/CSS, and memory use—and assigned a ranking to each contender. In the case of very close results, we assigned a "tie." In two cases—Internet Explorer on JavaScript and CSS, Safari on nine-tab loading—we had to assign zeros, though, obviously, each browser can perform those functions, but that's how it goes."

Does the speed of the browser really affect your choice? I mean, sure, if there is a significant difference like those measured in minutes, or even tens of seconds, but for most browsing, I have found most have a particular preference, logical or not. I would think that for browsers, the competition would be more for features than in speed. The tests seems reasonable and somewhat based on real world performance, though I have heard claims were some people load up hundreds of tabs for a single browser. I wonder what the performance metrics would be on that kind of scenario.


Wednesday, May 5, 2010

The Best Browser Promo Video I've Ever Seen

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Thoughts Media Off Topic" @ 11:30 AM

This is off topic for sites other than Digital Home Thoughts, but this video is just so darn cool, I wanted to share it with everyone. Worth noting is that it's loading the pages out of the cache, so this is a rendering test, not a "download speed test", but it's perfectly valid because download speeds will vary from location to location. Personally, I still use Firefox more than Chrome - at some point, browsers are "fast enough" at page rendering and further improvements can't be perceived. I value stability and usefulness more than sheer speed at rendering. What about you?


Friday, June 19, 2009

Google Asks People "What's a Browser?"

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Digital Home Talk" @ 10:05 AM

http://pleaseenjoy.com/project.php?...=131&navpoint=0

"What is a browser? was the question we (Google) asked over 50 passersby of different ages and backgrounds in the Times Square in New York. Watch the many responses people came up with."

That video is HILARIOUS. It just goes to show you how completely clueless most people are about the technology they use - though I have to admit I was surprised to see some of the younger people being just as clueless. It shows that technical knowledge is much less about age than it is about interest/desire to understand. And, frankly, most people aren't geeks and they don't care about how the technology works or even what it is that they're using. They'll typically only use something different or better if they're forced to - a new computer, a new operating system, etc.

The guy who said he uses the "big blue E" is pretty typical in my experience - though what surprised me was the confusion between a search engine and a browser. You'd think the fact that Internet Explorer says Internet Explorer everywhere would be a hint that the browser is called Internet Explorer. But people clearly pay more attention to what's going on INSIDE the browser - that's the experience they care about.


Wednesday, September 3, 2008

Google Launches "Chrome" Web Browser

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Digital Home Software" @ 08:50 AM

http://www.google.com/chrome

Yesterday, Google launched their own Web browser. Since this is pretty big news, I decided it was worth posting network-wide. Do we really need another browser? Before yesterday, my answer would have been no - I'm a very satisfied Firefox user, and Internet Explorer 8 is shaping up quite nicely. But after watching the 90 minute Google Webcast yesterday, I was very interested in with what Google had created. There's a great online comic that walks you through why Google created the browser, and what kinds of things were important to Google when creating Chrome. I think this comic is also how the browser was leaked before Google was ready to announce it. Read more...


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