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All posts tagged "ef mount"


Monday, September 17, 2012

Canon Announces EOS 6D: Canon's Answer to the Nikon D600

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 11:44 AM

http://www.dpreview.com/previews/canon-eos-6d/

Phew, it is going to be a busy day around here for me! Let's start with the main event: Canon has announced the EOS 6D, a cheaper 35mm-sized sensor camera aimed at the Canon crowd. It has a 20 megapixel sensor, but unlike the Nikon D600, Canon has done its old trick of using a lesser AF system: In this case, it is a new 11 point system with just one cross sensor. Canon claims it will be able to focus in darker environments, so maybe it will make up for the single cross point. Or maybe it won't. The rest of the specifications mostly matches up to its status as the kid brother to the 5D-series: 63 zone metering system, 4.5 frame continuous advance, a 3.2" VGA LCD display, a 97% viewfinder, a 1/180 flash sync speed. Video is available, and it is pretty much like any EOS DSLR: 1080p at 24, 25, and 30 FPS. There is also WiFi and GPS built-in, and with the right app on a smartphone (Android and iOS are supported), the phone can be used as a remote viewfinder. Ships in December for US$2100 for the camera alone, or US$2900 with the EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens. See the read link for a preview by DPReview.com!


Friday, June 15, 2012

Canon Announces EOS Rebel T4i/650D and Two New Lenses; We Have First Impressions

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 09:00 AM

http://www.dcresource.com/news/news...tem.php?id=4513

Canon last week announced the Rebel T4i/EOS 650D, and while it is one of Canon's famous incremental upgrades, it does make quite a nice package for casual shooters and point-and-shoot upgraders. The main new features are the 18 megapixel sensor with a hybrid design that incorporates phase-detect autofocus around the centre of the frame, promising faster AF in live view and video mode, a new 3" 7240x480 capacitive touchscreen, 9 point cross-type AF points, and 5 FPS continuous still shooting mode. The camera still does 1080p video at 24, 25 or 30 FPS. Ships in late June for US$850 body only, US$950 with the standard 18-55 kit lens, or US$1200 with the new 18-135 STM lens, which I will talk about next.

The two lenses are a special bunch: They are Canon's first "STM" lenses, which incorporates a stepping motor to allow for smooth and quiet autofocus while recording videos. The first is the 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 STM lens, which will ship in late June for US$550. The second is Canon's first pancake, the adorable 40mm f/2.8 STM, which is really small. Priced at US$200, I can imagine they will be quite popular when they appear in stores in late June. More specs at photos of the lenses at the read link, and jump past the break for my first impressions!

Read more...


Saturday, March 3, 2012

Canon Announces EOS 5D Mark III; Canon Users Rejoice

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 05:30 AM

This is under the better-late-than never category, but here goes. Canon has announced the 5DIII, and it is quite an impressive piece of kit. While the camera may not be quite the breakthrough its predecessors were (the 5DI was the first affordable 35mm DSLR, the 5DII was the first Canon video DSLR), it is the first 5D that is not compromised in the AF department. In addition to me not liking the Canon SLR UI, the AF on the 5D reminded me of how Canon cut corners in the AF system in the EOS D30 (and D60): Slow and underperforming compared to the rest of the camera. Thankfully, the 5DIII now gains the 1DX's 61 point AF module with 41 cross points and what Canon says are 5 dual cross points. These are not very sensitive for slower lenses, so make sure you have f/4 or faster lenses to make full use of the AF features.

The camera now uses a new 22 megapixel sensor, which personally I feel is more than enough for many purposes, and the accompanying electronics (what Canon markets as Digic 5+) is finally capable of removing lateral chromatic aberrations in-camera. That took long enough for Canon to implement a very handy feature. The sensor claims an ISO range of 100 to 25k, expandable to 100k. The new electronics also promises a fast readout that can support the maximum burst rate of 6 FPS for up to 18 RAW images and more than enough JPEGs (Canon claims 16,000).

The video section has been upgraded too, with the codec now supporting either intraframe or interframe compression, in resolutions of up to 1080p. There is also SMTPE timecode support, which is aimed at professionals using mutiple-cameras (or even audio recorders). There is an audio jack for monitoring audio, a microphone jack (not the XLR variety though) and very nicely, the rear-wheel is now touch sensitive, so settings can be changed without jerking the camera during recording.

There are a number of other upgrades, like the new 100% optical viewfinder, a new 3.2" 720x480 LCD screen, in-camera HDR, a few nice tweaks to the UI (still will not make me use a Canon SLR without tearing my hair out however), and a lot more. Check out the read link which goes to DPReview. The Canon 5D Mark III will be available for US$3500 in end of March.


Tuesday, February 7, 2012

Canon Announces Three New Lenses for EF-mount

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 01:00 AM

http://www.dpreview.com/news/2012/0...IS_28mm_f2p8_IS

"Canon has released three EF lenses, including an updated 24-70mm F2.8 II USM. The latest version features what is promised to be a more durable body, despite being a little smaller. In addition to this high-end full-frame standard zoom, there are completely redesigned semi-fast 24mm and 28mm F2.8 primes, both of which feature USM focus motors and image stabilization."

Canon has updated three lenses, including a highly popular one, and leaves me slightly confused. For some strange reason Canon has seen it fit to add IS to light wide angle primes, but thinks the heavier 24-70 with a telephoto end needs it less (which in my opinion, does not). Sometimes you wonder what the camera companies are thinking. In any case, the 24-70/2.8 L II is a new lens, and not just minor update to the previous 24-70/2.8 L. It promises better image quality, and better physical durability. The 24/2.8 and 28/2.8 have small wideangle primes, but now come with IS (which I still find utterly weird), and newly designed optics. No word on pricing or availability.


Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Canon Europe Explains the EOS-1D X

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 08:00 AM

http://cpn.canon-europe.com/content..._x_explained.do

"The EOS-1D X is the new flagship camera in the Canon DSLR range, taking the best of the EOS-1D and EOS-1Ds cameras and melding them into a single unit that gives both high resolution and high speed shooting. No longer do you need to choose between the two when both are available in one body."

Here is some more information about the 1D X, straight from Canon Europe. Regardless if you have the money to buy one, it should be interesting for those of you who wonder at what a top-of-the-line camera is like.


Monday, October 17, 2011

Canon Announces EOS-1D X; Looks to Reclaim Crown from Nikon

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 10:33 PM

http://www.dpreview.com/news/1110/1...canoneos1dx.asp

"Canon has announced the launch of the EOS-1D X, its latest flagship professional DSLR. The 18MP camera is built around a full-frame sensor capable of shooting at up to 14 frames per second (12fps with AF), allowing it to replace both the 1D Mark IV and 1DS Mark III in Canon's lineup."

I am not sure if this will truly replace the EOS-1DS series, but after Nikon's success with the D3 and D3s, Canon probably felt the old 1D and its APS-H sized sensor needed a rework, and the EOS-1D X is the result. Canon certainly is seeking to upstage Nikon in all areas: The 1D X has an 18 megapixel sensor that allows ISO 512,000 natively, and ISO 2,048,00 when boosted. Despite the huge number, I would like to remind readers that it is just two stops above the native ISO limit. Ah, the wonders of multiplication. Other areas of improvement (and one-upmanship) include a new 61 point AF sensor with 21 cross sensors, improved AF tracking (after the 1DIV fiasco) with what Canon calls EOS iTR AF, a new 100,000 pixel RGB sensor (a Canon first), and up to 14 FPS continuous shooting (12 FPS with AF tracking). There is even a gigabit Ethernet port for transmitting photos, along with dual Compactflash card slots.

The improvements also extend to the video side of things, with 1080p video available in 24p, 25p or 30p, and 720p available in 50p or 60p. Manual audio level control is present, along with a stereo mic-in jack, and on the software side of things, Canon promises better codecs that offer intra-frame or inter-frame compression, along with timecode embedding (cue squealing from video editors).

Canon is even seeking to upstage Nikon in the UI department: Where Nikon offers two buttons between the camera grip and the lens mount for the photographer to use, Canon is offering four for the EOS 1D X user; two for each orientation. Talk about leaving no stone unturned. Incidentally this makes the Canon UI starting to look more like the Nikon.

The EOS 1D X will only be available in March 2012 for US$6,800. Canon is probably hoping to pre-empt Nikon's D4 announcement, whenever that is. More photos after the break. See the link to DPReview for an overview, as well as the very compact Wifi and GPS accessories for the EOS 1DX.

Read more...


Monday, July 18, 2011

Lifehacker's Guide to Choosing Cameras

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 10:00 AM

http://lifehacker.com/5822098/how-t...-for-your-needs

"Choosing a digital camera used to be a simple process that was heavily dictated by the amount of money in your pocket. Now the same money can buy you different benefits and compromises, making the decision much more complex. Here's a look at your camera-buying options, the pros and cons of each, and some specific suggestions to help you pick the perfect camera for your needs."

Lifehacker has a long article on how to choose a camera (and it even includes a guide on cameras in phones), but I recommended not going through the recommended picks just because they are there. Seriously, a Sony NEX-3?


Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Canon Offers Rebel T3 in Multiple Colours; Rest of the World Yawns

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 01:00 PM

http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/20/...t3-in-assorted/

"The outfit's now selling its beginner-friendly EOS Rebel T3 in red, brown, and metallic gray -- all in addition to your garden-variety black, of course. Sure, that's tame by Pentax's wacky standards, but for Canon it's pretty... outlandish."

For those in Europe and Asia, this is nothing new. The EOS 1100D (as the T3 is called there) has already been available in these colours for months now. Personally, I think the red is striking, but its a real pity that the lenses that come with the coloured DSLRs do not match: They are still the same black 18-55 lens. Promotional price is now US$550, so now is a good time to grab them if you want them funky colours.


Friday, April 15, 2011

Canon Rebel T3/EOS 1100D Reviewed by Digital Photography Review

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 04:35 PM

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos1100d/

"The 1100D takes a series of familiar-sounding components and folds them together in a distinctly conventional but still capable-sounding package. So there's a 12MP CMOS chip that is likely to date back to the 450D/XSi, coupled with Canon's now-standard 9-point AF system and the 63-area iFCL (Focus, color and luminance sensitive) metering system first seen in the EOS 7D."

The Canon Rebel T3/EOS 1100D is something I thought I would never see. After letting the predecessor languish in obscurity for a good two years, it looked like Canon had given up on the ultra-budget DSLR. With the T3/1100D, it looks like they have not. On paper it looks like a competent if slightly rehashed. Still, the low price means it should sell well. I am rather amused by the red; pity Canon did not come up with a matching lens! For you die-hard 1st gen Zune lovers, there is also... brown. Coloured up versions available at our affiliate store.


Monday, April 4, 2011

Canon Rebel T3i/EOS 600D Reviewed by Digital Photography Review

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 09:30 AM

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos600d/

"The new kid on the block can most succinctly be described as a 550D with an articulated screen, that also incorporates many of the beginner-friendly features we first saw on the more enthusiast-orientated EOS 60D. Perhaps most notable of these is 'Basic+', a simple, results-orientated approach to image adjustments in the scene-based exposure modes, that allows the user to change the look of their images and control background blur without needing to know anything technical about how this all works."

Canon, the masters of the incremental upgrade, have done it again. I think the above paragraph sums up the EOS 600D nicely: A 550D with a swivel LCD and some software changes. Still, that makes it a pretty decent camera, as the 550D was no slouch to begin with. For someone looking for a new DSLR in the Canon camp, it is hard to go wrong with it. I wonder though, if Canon is going to make anything exciting ever again...


Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Canon Announces Rebel T3i and T3 (aka EOS 600D and 1100D)

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 09:10 AM

Apologies; this originally went up on the 7th but due to a glitch did not make the front page.

Well, with the CP+ show (organised by the Japanese camera trade association CIPA) starting on the 9th of Feb, naturally there will be a few new camera announcements. Today Canon leads the headlines, starting with the consumer Rebel T3i and T3 (EOS 600D and 1100D in Europe and Asia) cameras. Canon, being the master of incremental upgrades, made me look very hard for the upgrades to the T3i. The main changes are the addition of a swivel LCD (the LCD itself remains the same 3" VGA screen), new video modes of 1080p at 24, 25 and 30 FPS with the promise of full manual control, and the ability to control compatible flashes wirelessly via the internal flash. A few changes to the software side of the camera, like a new A+ Auto mode (taken from Panasonic), Creative Filters (taken from Olympus) and a "Feature Guide" (taken from Nikon) to guide new shooters round up the upgrades. The core of the camera, which features an 18 megapixel APS-C sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 with 9 AF points and 63 zone metering, remains the same. The camera will ship in March for about US$800 body only, US$900 with the new 18-55 IS II lens, and US$1100 with the 18-135 IS lens.

Up next is the Rebel T3 (EOS 1100D), which has a bit more upgrades. The camera has a new 12 megapixel sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 (I guess from the 40D), and utilises the same 9 point AF and 63 zone metering system from its bigger brothers. Cost-cutting measures include the lack of a swivel LCD, a smaller 2.7" QVGA LCD, 720p video at only 30 FPS, and a cheaper, less solid body. The camera will ship in March for about US$600 with the 18-55 IS II lens.

Rebel T3i/EOS 600D Preview

Rebel T3/EOS 1100D Preview

Images of the Rebel T3 and the rear of the T3i after the break. Read more...


Monday, February 7, 2011

Canon Announces Rebel T3i and T3 (aka EOS 600D and 1100D)

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 10:32 AM

Well, with the CP+ show (organised by the Japanese camera trade association CIPA) starting on the 9th of Feb, naturally there will be a few new camera announcements. Today Canon leads the headlines, starting with the consumer Rebel T3i and T3 (EOS 600D and 1100D in Europe and Asia) cameras. Canon, being the master of incremental upgrades, made me look very hard for the upgrades to the T3i. The main changes are the addition of a swivel LCD (the LCD itself remains the same 3" VGA screen), new video modes of 1080p at 24, 25 and 30 FPS with the promise of full manual control, and the ability to control compatible flashes wirelessly via the internal flash. A few changes to the software side of the camera, like a new A+ Auto mode (taken from Panasonic), Creative Filters (taken from Olympus) and a "Feature Guide" (taken from Nikon) to guide new shooters round up the upgrades. The core of the camera, which features an 18 megapixel APS-C sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 with 9 AF points and 63 zone metering, remains the same. The camera will ship in March for about US$800 body only, US$900 with the new 18-55 IS II lens, and US$1100 with the 18-135 IS lens.

Up next is the Rebel T3 (EOS 1100D), which has a bit more upgrades. The camera has a new 12 megapixel sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 (I guess from the 40D), and utilises the same 9 point AF and 63 zone metering system from its bigger brothers. Cost-cutting measures include the lack of a swivel LCD, a smaller 2.7" QVGA LCD, 720p video at only 30 FPS, and a cheaper, less solid body. The camera will ship in March for about US$600 with the 18-55 IS II lens.

Rebel T3i/EOS 600D Preview

Rebel T3/EOS 1100D Preview

Images of the Rebel T3 and the rear of the T3i after the break. Read more...


Canon Announces Speedlites 320EX and 270EX II and Telephoto Lenses with Eye-watering Prices

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 10:31 AM

Canon also announced a few products to go with the the EF system. The more relevant ones to the site's readership will be the Speedlites 320EX and 270EX II. The former features an integrated LED (even though magnified by a lens, the LED's die looks huge) for video purposes, while both flashes have wireless slave features. They also have the interesting Pocketwizard-like ability to trigger the shutter of a compatible Canon DSLR. They are expected to ship in April for US$250 for the 320EX, and US$$170 for the 270EX II.

As for the lenses, the new products are the 500mm f/4 and 600mm f/4 L IS II lenses, which will come with the usual 5-digit price tags (or near 5-digit). The third lens is the 200-400mm f/4 IS, which is still being developed. Countering the popularity of the Nikon 200-400/4, Canon also added the trick of integrating a 1.4x teleconvertor. Convenience, or unneeded weight and bulk? You decide (if you are in the market for such a lens in the first place).

Canon Speedlite 270EX II and 320EX

Canon 200-400mm f/4L IS USM Development Announcement

Canon 500mm and 600mm f/4L IS USM II

Picture of the 270EX II after the break.

Read more...


Thursday, January 20, 2011

More Glass for Less: A Simple Guide to Inexpensive Lenses

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 08:00 AM

As more people get into photography as a hobby, a common refrain heard is that it is an expensive hobby. It is not without some truth, as hobbies by their nature can involve spending large outlays of money since it is human nature to delve deeper into our interests, and hobbies that involve any kind of gear will have many opportunities for the hobbyist to spend their hard-earned money on. Not helping is today's world of marketing departments' promises of being better at what you do if you buy their companies' products or services.

Even if you ignore the messages from marketing, you still need some basic gear to take a photo, like a lens, and lenses can be very very expensive. Lenses can range from the popular f/2.8 zooms (as much as US$2,000+) to the super telephoto lenses (too much). Thankfully, there are cheap options out there, some good, some downright awful. So what does a budget (and budding) photographer buy? Well, here's a short roundup of some lenses that can be considered to be not too expensive.

Read more...


Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Things I Want to See in 2011

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Articles & Resources" @ 08:00 AM

Welcome to 2011! The last decade was a breath-taking one for digital photography, and the last few years have brought about a torrent of changes and improvements, along with the digital revolution settling down somewhat. Still, a new year brings new possibilities, and here is what I would like to see for 2011:

1. Open Platform Camera

One reason for the popularity of cameras in smartphones is the software you can add to it. Want different effects? Download an app to process them on the phone. Want to see said effects in real-time? Download an app to replace the default camera app. Want an intervalometer? Download an app for that too!

Having an open platform for developers to add functionality to the camera would be an amazing selling point. This would go beyond consumer-level gee-whiz; there is plenty for for enthusiasts too. Change button assignments, tone curves (this has existed but not always the easiest to do), even autofocus and auto exposure behaviour for the adventerous. There is also something to be said for spending less time in image editors...

Of course this would kill some manufacturers' unique selling points. Olympus and their Art Filters will probably be the first casualty. Coupled with most camera companies being conservative in nature, this is unlikely to happen from a traditional manufacturer. Anyone out there willing to take a chance on this?

2. Truly Connected Cameras

Tying in with the above point on open platforms, connectivity is the next big thing. Most of us share our photos digitally nowadays, and the Internet is the main way to do this. Standalone cameras still rely heavily on having a computer to do this. Smartphone cameras are showing the way this should be done, so where are the connected cameras? The Olympus E-PL2's bluetooth dongle (a leaked piece of news at this time of writing) is a step forward, and hopefully will set the tone for the rest of the year.

Read more...


Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Gizmodo's List of "Budget" Lenses

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 11:38 AM

http://gizmodo.com/5707140/the-best...t-camera-lenses

"If you're shopping for a new lens of some sort, you've come to just the right place. Here's ThePhoblographer's list of the best lenses you can get your hands on without breaking the bank."

Defnitely a budget lens: Nikkor DX AF-S 35mm f/1.8G

Alright, I know it's hard to write articles (else I'd do some more myself), but I wish some writers would write more for their target audience than for themselves. While some of the lenses in the list are indeed budget (normal lenses are usually not expensive), they're all prime lenses. I'm thinking a general techblog on this topic should include some budget but quality zooms in the list (Tamron's 17-50 comes to mind). Also, when going through the list, note that there's no distinction between the use of the lens on APS-C-sized and 35mm-sized sensors for Nikon and Canon systems. There's no mention of other systems, but hey, I guess they don't count in today's market.

And really, the Nikkor AF 28mm f/2.8D? The neutered version from the manual focus version that drops two elements and CRC (Close Range Correction System) is hardly what I call legendary. Budget certainly, but not my favourite wide angle Nikkor, which is hardly wide once you mount it on a DX camera; see my point on not making distinctions on sensor sizes when discussing lenses.


Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Canon EOS 60D Reviewed by Digital Photography Review

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 04:03 PM

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos60d/

"With the 60D Canon has unashamedly moved the X0D range out of the 'semi pro' bracket and instead focused on the enthusiast photographer looking to upgrade from their Rebel. As a result, it's not the obvious continuation of the 30D - 40D - 50D pattern that its naming might suggest. Instead it sits pretty well precisely in the same market position as was once-upon-a-time occupied by the 'Elan' series of 35mm film SLRs (which in Europe were not-so-coincidentally given double-digit model numbers)."

Despite the doom and gloom behind the 60D's downgrade, DPReview found it a pretty compelling camera, especially those looking to upgrade from a 550D and not wanting to spend too much. I know a couple of people who'd have been pleased if this came out when they were looking to upgrade!


Thursday, August 26, 2010

Canon Announces a Slew of Lenses

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 09:00 AM

http://www.canon.ca/inetCA/newsroom...tPress&pid=1066

"MISSISSAUGA, ON., August 26, 2010 – Canon Canada Inc., a leader in digital imaging, rounds out its Summer product introductions with four new L-series lenses and two new accessory extenders for professionals and advanced amateurs. Leading the introductions, the EF 8-15mm f/4L Fisheye USM lens* is the world’s widest fisheye zoom lens, providing professional photographers and cinematographers with a unique optical tool for capturing 180º angle-of-view shots on all EOS Digital SLR cameras. Photographers looking for a broad focal length range with excellent image quality will enjoy the Company’s first L-series 70-300mm telephoto zoom lens, the new EF 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM lens*, delivering outstanding sharpness, contrast and colour fidelity in a compact, lightweight form factor."

The most interesting lenses among the lot of the new Canon lenses, are the 8-15/4L and the 70-300/4.5-5.6L. Fisheye lovers, rejoice! An 8 to 15mm zoom fisheye is here, so you can pick all the different ways you can distort the world in your photos.. Also some nice news for Canon users, is a 70-300/4-5.6L zoom lens. The 70-300s have usually been cheap telephoto consumer zoom lenses, but they have been used by pros for their light weight and compact size. Now that there's an L version of the lens, quality should step up, while mostly retaining the size and the weight. What is lost is the cheap price: US$1,500 is almost as much a 70-200/2.8 L USM lens. The other announcements include an update to the f/2.8 superteles; the 300/2.8 and 400/2.8, as well as the 1.4x and 2.0x teleconverters. Press release and images of the other lenses after the break.

Read more...


Canon EOS 60D Announced; Preview by Digital Photography Review

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 08:35 AM

http://www.dpreview.com/news/1008/1...canoneos60d.asp

"Canon has unveiled the EOS 60D mid-level DSLR, replacing the EOS 50D. However, following the launch of the EOS 7D, the 60D has been repositioned in the market, so isn't a simple upgrade to its predecessor. Instead the 60D is a smaller camera featuring an articulated screen and plastic body shell and utilizing SD memory cards. It combines the 18MP CMOS sensor and 1040k dot 3.0" LCD from the EOS 550D (Rebel T2i) with the AF system from the 50D."

The 60D is a the latest in a long line that stretches back from the D30, and in a way it returns to its roots as a mid-range DSLR camera. While 50D users will probably want to upgrade to something like the 7D or even the 5DII, the 60D is a compelling purchase for those who want something a little more advanced than the 550D, while not spending too much. It's certainly a nicely specified camera, and while smaller, the grip certainly looks more usable than the on on the 550D!


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