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All posts tagged "canon"


Wednesday, April 27, 2011

The Canon PowerShot SD1300 IS: The Ambitious Beginner's Camera

Posted by Angelina Purpura in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 08:00 AM

Product Category: Digital Camera (Point-And-Shoot Variety)
Manufacturer: Canon
Where to Buy: Amazon [Affiliate Store]
Price: $143.96
Specifications: Provided by Canon
Pros:
  • Pocked-sized - perfect for on-the-go photo ops;
  • Wide array of customizable settings;
  • Light without feeling flimsy.
Cons:
  • Poor performance in low-light conditions;
  • Slow processing at times.

Summary: This is not a technical review of the camera. This model has been out for a while, and has been examined in its full photo-taking glory by many experts. Instead this is a review of what it's like for a total amateur to own and operate this camera.

Read more...


Friday, April 15, 2011

Aurora Borealis in Two Minute Timelapse of Flight from San Francisco to Paris

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home News" @ 06:00 PM

http://mashable.com/2011/04/08/time...urora-borealis/

This is really neat, if nothing, it's another excuse to see the Aurora Borelias!


Canon Rebel T3/EOS 1100D Reviewed by Digital Photography Review

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 04:35 PM

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos1100d/

"The 1100D takes a series of familiar-sounding components and folds them together in a distinctly conventional but still capable-sounding package. So there's a 12MP CMOS chip that is likely to date back to the 450D/XSi, coupled with Canon's now-standard 9-point AF system and the 63-area iFCL (Focus, color and luminance sensitive) metering system first seen in the EOS 7D."

The Canon Rebel T3/EOS 1100D is something I thought I would never see. After letting the predecessor languish in obscurity for a good two years, it looked like Canon had given up on the ultra-budget DSLR. With the T3/1100D, it looks like they have not. On paper it looks like a competent if slightly rehashed. Still, the low price means it should sell well. I am rather amused by the red; pity Canon did not come up with a matching lens! For you die-hard 1st gen Zune lovers, there is also... brown. Coloured up versions available at our affiliate store.


Wednesday, April 13, 2011

GPS Ultra Zoom Camera Roundup

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 01:00 PM

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/c...ra-zoom-cameras

"One of the most popular digital camera genres in recent years has been what some have called the "travel zoom". These compact cameras have typically featured lenses of around 10X - 14X, large LCDs, and HD movie modes. In 2011, camera manufacturers really put the "travel" in travel zoom, by adding GPS receivers to their cameras. So, not only do you now have a camera which can go anywhere, but you'll know exactly where you took the photo."

One advantage of dedicated cameras is the ability to offer a zoom lens, so huge zoom factors are still pretty much a selling point. Combine that with a compact size and the result is a camera that still sells pretty well in this age of smartphones. I was a bit surprised at the winner of this shoot out, but I won't spoil the surprise, other than saying that the initial debut of the line was very lacklustre to begin with. Well done C... I mean, camera company!


Monday, April 4, 2011

Canon Rebel T3i/EOS 600D Reviewed by Digital Photography Review

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 09:30 AM

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos600d/

"The new kid on the block can most succinctly be described as a 550D with an articulated screen, that also incorporates many of the beginner-friendly features we first saw on the more enthusiast-orientated EOS 60D. Perhaps most notable of these is 'Basic+', a simple, results-orientated approach to image adjustments in the scene-based exposure modes, that allows the user to change the look of their images and control background blur without needing to know anything technical about how this all works."

Canon, the masters of the incremental upgrade, have done it again. I think the above paragraph sums up the EOS 600D nicely: A 550D with a swivel LCD and some software changes. Still, that makes it a pretty decent camera, as the 550D was no slouch to begin with. For someone looking for a new DSLR in the Canon camp, it is hard to go wrong with it. I wonder though, if Canon is going to make anything exciting ever again...


Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Canon Announces Rebel T3i and T3 (aka EOS 600D and 1100D)

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 09:10 AM

Apologies; this originally went up on the 7th but due to a glitch did not make the front page.

Well, with the CP+ show (organised by the Japanese camera trade association CIPA) starting on the 9th of Feb, naturally there will be a few new camera announcements. Today Canon leads the headlines, starting with the consumer Rebel T3i and T3 (EOS 600D and 1100D in Europe and Asia) cameras. Canon, being the master of incremental upgrades, made me look very hard for the upgrades to the T3i. The main changes are the addition of a swivel LCD (the LCD itself remains the same 3" VGA screen), new video modes of 1080p at 24, 25 and 30 FPS with the promise of full manual control, and the ability to control compatible flashes wirelessly via the internal flash. A few changes to the software side of the camera, like a new A+ Auto mode (taken from Panasonic), Creative Filters (taken from Olympus) and a "Feature Guide" (taken from Nikon) to guide new shooters round up the upgrades. The core of the camera, which features an 18 megapixel APS-C sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 with 9 AF points and 63 zone metering, remains the same. The camera will ship in March for about US$800 body only, US$900 with the new 18-55 IS II lens, and US$1100 with the 18-135 IS lens.

Up next is the Rebel T3 (EOS 1100D), which has a bit more upgrades. The camera has a new 12 megapixel sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 (I guess from the 40D), and utilises the same 9 point AF and 63 zone metering system from its bigger brothers. Cost-cutting measures include the lack of a swivel LCD, a smaller 2.7" QVGA LCD, 720p video at only 30 FPS, and a cheaper, less solid body. The camera will ship in March for about US$600 with the 18-55 IS II lens.

Rebel T3i/EOS 600D Preview

Rebel T3/EOS 1100D Preview

Images of the Rebel T3 and the rear of the T3i after the break. Read more...


Monday, February 7, 2011

Canon Announces Rebel T3i and T3 (aka EOS 600D and 1100D)

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 10:32 AM

Well, with the CP+ show (organised by the Japanese camera trade association CIPA) starting on the 9th of Feb, naturally there will be a few new camera announcements. Today Canon leads the headlines, starting with the consumer Rebel T3i and T3 (EOS 600D and 1100D in Europe and Asia) cameras. Canon, being the master of incremental upgrades, made me look very hard for the upgrades to the T3i. The main changes are the addition of a swivel LCD (the LCD itself remains the same 3" VGA screen), new video modes of 1080p at 24, 25 and 30 FPS with the promise of full manual control, and the ability to control compatible flashes wirelessly via the internal flash. A few changes to the software side of the camera, like a new A+ Auto mode (taken from Panasonic), Creative Filters (taken from Olympus) and a "Feature Guide" (taken from Nikon) to guide new shooters round up the upgrades. The core of the camera, which features an 18 megapixel APS-C sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 with 9 AF points and 63 zone metering, remains the same. The camera will ship in March for about US$800 body only, US$900 with the new 18-55 IS II lens, and US$1100 with the 18-135 IS lens.

Up next is the Rebel T3 (EOS 1100D), which has a bit more upgrades. The camera has a new 12 megapixel sensor rated at ISO 100-6400 (I guess from the 40D), and utilises the same 9 point AF and 63 zone metering system from its bigger brothers. Cost-cutting measures include the lack of a swivel LCD, a smaller 2.7" QVGA LCD, 720p video at only 30 FPS, and a cheaper, less solid body. The camera will ship in March for about US$600 with the 18-55 IS II lens.

Rebel T3i/EOS 600D Preview

Rebel T3/EOS 1100D Preview

Images of the Rebel T3 and the rear of the T3i after the break. Read more...


Canon Announces Four New Powershots with HS (High Speed) Sensors

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 10:30 AM

The final Canon headline today is some ice news. Canon for once is not joining in upping the megapixel stakes today by announcing a bunch of compacts using the same 12 megapixel CMOS sensor with the ability to shoot 1080p videos at 24 FPS, as well as some neat tricks like QVGA video at 240 FPS. If the previous incarnation of the sensor in the IXUS 300 HS is anything to go by, these will be quite good pocket shooters. All feature the new Canon software, which allows for auto scene mode selection, along with all the colour swap/faux tilt/whatever options currently present in Canon's compact lineup.

First on the list is the Powershot SX230 HS compact superzoom, which features its predecessor's 14x optically stabilised 28-392mm equivalent f/3.1-5.9 lens and 3" HVGA LCD. What's new is the above mentioned sensor and the inclusion of a GPS system for geotagging photos. Expect the camera to appear in March for US$350. There is also a Europe (Asia too?) version called the SX220 HS, which just drops the GPS receiver.

Next up are the ELPH/IXUS cameras. Leading the pack is the ELPH 500 HS/IXUS 310 HS, an update of the SD 4000 IS/IXUS 300 HS. It features a new 4.4x optically stabilised 24-105mm equivalent f/2.0-5.8 lens with a 3.2" HVGA touchscreen LCD, and loses the option of having the camera come in black. I really liked the matte black version of the IXUS 300 HS, and that camera's red option was something to talk about. The current options of pastel pink, brown (the horror) and silver are just not very interesting. Ships in March for US$300.

Following that is my favourite of the bunch, the ELPH 300 HS/IXUS 220 HS, which is an update of the very slim and compact SD 1400 IS/IXUS 130 IS. The new lens now starts at a 24mm equivalent, giving a 5x optically stabilised 24-120mm equivalent f/2.7-5.9 lens. Nice! The rest of the camera is pretty much unchanged, with a 2.7" QVGA LCD screen and very good looks. Did I mention it is very slim and compact? Ships in March for US$250.

Finally, the ELPH 100 HS/IXUS 115 HS. It's main advantage is price, at US$200 (an IXUS for US$200, who'd have thought?), but the features are still pretty decent. Mated with the HS sensor is a 4x optically stabilised 28-112mm equivalent, and the camera features a 3" QVGA LCD screen. Not bad for US$200. Ships in March.

Commentary: I have to say, Canon's compacts are now pretty good. After a period where they were churning out cameras with 3x/4x 35-105/140mm equivalent lenses for the longest time, Panasonic and their cameras pushing for HD videos, easy-to-use auto scene modes, and lenses that start wider (28mm and wider is not uncommon) just looked way more interesting. Looking good did not hurt either, and unlike most manufacturers, Panasonic did not restrict good looks to the top end of the range. Canon using the "HS" sensors is a good move. Now the only thing left is, will consumers be interested in the better quality of images over camera phones?

Images of the other cameras after the break.

Canon Powershot SX230 HS

Canon Powershot ELPH 500 HS/IXUS 310 HS

Canon Powershot ELPH 300 HS/IXUS 220 HS

Canon Powershot ELPH 100 HS/IXUS 115 HS

Read more...


Friday, February 4, 2011

Nikon Rumors Compares Nikon S8100 with Canon S95 in One-sided Fight

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 02:00 PM

http://nikonrumors.com/2011/02/02/n...act-camera.aspx

"I am very particular when it comes to small (pocketable) cameras and I wanted to find out how good (or bad) the top of the line Coolpix S8100 really is. I ignored the P7000 because it is in a different category - I wanted to see what a "real" point and shoot Nikon camera is all about. A natural choice for my comparison was the Canon S95 which is the top of the line compact camera currently offered by Canon. I know this is not fair fight since the Canon S95 can shoot RAW, has manual mode and costs $100 more."

Not fair indeed - NikonRumors.com has decided to pit a S8100 against the S95, a camera designed for more serious use (the sensor on the S95 is already better on paper). I think stating the outcome is unnecessary, but the statement on Nikon needing to put out something more serious than their recent (or last seven years) compact cameras is quite a bit more debatable. Given the squeeze between phones with cameras and mirrorless large sensor compacts, as well as the competitors (Panasonic, Canon, Samsung, Olympus), I wonder if there is still space in the market for another entrant. There is only brand-name recognition for Nikon to rely on as an advantage here, as there will be little system compatibility with the F-mount system.

Nikon also has to take some of the blame here in getting into this situation in the first place. They are now far behind in the game with Panasonic's LX series on its 4th iteration, and even when attempting to compete, the P7000's execution left quite a bit to be desired. What is frustrating is that Nikon can do it. See the D3 and D300 launch as proof that Nikon can do it at a higher level.

If you are still interested in the S8100, here's another review.


Thursday, January 20, 2011

More Glass for Less: A Simple Guide to Inexpensive Lenses

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 08:00 AM

As more people get into photography as a hobby, a common refrain heard is that it is an expensive hobby. It is not without some truth, as hobbies by their nature can involve spending large outlays of money since it is human nature to delve deeper into our interests, and hobbies that involve any kind of gear will have many opportunities for the hobbyist to spend their hard-earned money on. Not helping is today's world of marketing departments' promises of being better at what you do if you buy their companies' products or services.

Even if you ignore the messages from marketing, you still need some basic gear to take a photo, like a lens, and lenses can be very very expensive. Lenses can range from the popular f/2.8 zooms (as much as US$2,000+) to the super telephoto lenses (too much). Thankfully, there are cheap options out there, some good, some downright awful. So what does a budget (and budding) photographer buy? Well, here's a short roundup of some lenses that can be considered to be not too expensive.

Read more...


Friday, January 7, 2011

CANON PIXMA MX882 Bridges the Digital with the Physical

Posted by Hooch Tan in "Digital Home News" @ 10:00 AM

http://www.engadget.com/2011/01/06/...th-superpowers/

"Printers don't often get us hot and bothered, but Canon's PIXMA MX882 certainly has us intrigued. The main draw is that Dual Function panel up front, which combines a 3-inch LCD with a unique set of hard keys that have dynamic displays below that change depending on what function you're trying to access."

The paperless society is a myth. While paper is on its way out, especially when everyone and their hamster has some sort of connected electronic device, there still is a demand for scanning and printing and the MX882 looks like a pretty good choice for all-in-ones. It has more features and abilities than office printers five or ten years ago! I am also really glad to see that Ethernet connectivity (and Wi-Fi too) is becoming more common. In a world of multi-computer households, the one computer, one printer model seems wasteful so making multi-user printers standard is a Good Thing. Of course, that is if you still print stuff. I suspect that now that tablets are taking over the world, there will be even less that will need to be in dead tree format.


Thursday, January 6, 2011

Canon's Budget Cameras Announced

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 06:00 AM

http://www.dcresource.com/news/news...tem.php?id=4233

I woke up this morning and found a bunch of new camera announcements, so let's get to it. Starting off, we have four budget cameras from Canon; an update of the lowest entry-level A-series camera, and a trio of 4-digit A-series cameras. I guess the IXUS/ELPH cameras will come later.

First up, we have the Powershot A3300 IS, the most expensive of the lot at about US$180. As implied in the name, there is image stabilisation accompanying its 5x 28-140mm equivalent f/2.8-5.9 zoom lens. The camera comes with a 16 megapixel CCD, 3" LCD, and the ability to record 720P videos.

Next up is the Powershot A2200 at about US$140, which has a 4x 28-140mm equivalent f/2.8-5.9 zoom lens, a 14 megapixel LCD, and the ability to record 720p video. Its little brother, the A1200, features similar specs, but has a 12 megapixel CCD, and a less attractive looking body (though there is an optical viewfinder). It also records 720p video; not a bad feat for something that costs about US$110.

Finally the cheapie of the bunch, the A800, continues the tradition of the budget Powershot having a very un-wide lens, from 37mm to 122mm equivalent at f/3.0-5.8. a tiny grainy LCD (by today's standards) of 2.5", and VGA movie mode (at least it's VGA with sound this time). At about US$90, the A1200 is far better value. The cameras will be available come February. More photos at the source link.


Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Things I Want to See in 2011

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Articles & Resources" @ 08:00 AM

Welcome to 2011! The last decade was a breath-taking one for digital photography, and the last few years have brought about a torrent of changes and improvements, along with the digital revolution settling down somewhat. Still, a new year brings new possibilities, and here is what I would like to see for 2011:

1. Open Platform Camera

One reason for the popularity of cameras in smartphones is the software you can add to it. Want different effects? Download an app to process them on the phone. Want to see said effects in real-time? Download an app to replace the default camera app. Want an intervalometer? Download an app for that too!

Having an open platform for developers to add functionality to the camera would be an amazing selling point. This would go beyond consumer-level gee-whiz; there is plenty for for enthusiasts too. Change button assignments, tone curves (this has existed but not always the easiest to do), even autofocus and auto exposure behaviour for the adventerous. There is also something to be said for spending less time in image editors...

Of course this would kill some manufacturers' unique selling points. Olympus and their Art Filters will probably be the first casualty. Coupled with most camera companies being conservative in nature, this is unlikely to happen from a traditional manufacturer. Anyone out there willing to take a chance on this?

2. Truly Connected Cameras

Tying in with the above point on open platforms, connectivity is the next big thing. Most of us share our photos digitally nowadays, and the Internet is the main way to do this. Standalone cameras still rely heavily on having a computer to do this. Smartphone cameras are showing the way this should be done, so where are the connected cameras? The Olympus E-PL2's bluetooth dongle (a leaked piece of news at this time of writing) is a step forward, and hopefully will set the tone for the rest of the year.

Read more...


Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Gizmodo's List of "Budget" Lenses

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 11:38 AM

http://gizmodo.com/5707140/the-best...t-camera-lenses

"If you're shopping for a new lens of some sort, you've come to just the right place. Here's ThePhoblographer's list of the best lenses you can get your hands on without breaking the bank."

Defnitely a budget lens: Nikkor DX AF-S 35mm f/1.8G

Alright, I know it's hard to write articles (else I'd do some more myself), but I wish some writers would write more for their target audience than for themselves. While some of the lenses in the list are indeed budget (normal lenses are usually not expensive), they're all prime lenses. I'm thinking a general techblog on this topic should include some budget but quality zooms in the list (Tamron's 17-50 comes to mind). Also, when going through the list, note that there's no distinction between the use of the lens on APS-C-sized and 35mm-sized sensors for Nikon and Canon systems. There's no mention of other systems, but hey, I guess they don't count in today's market.

And really, the Nikkor AF 28mm f/2.8D? The neutered version from the manual focus version that drops two elements and CRC (Close Range Correction System) is hardly what I call legendary. Budget certainly, but not my favourite wide angle Nikkor, which is hardly wide once you mount it on a DX camera; see my point on not making distinctions on sensor sizes when discussing lenses.


Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Digital Photography Review's Premium Compact Roundup

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 04:54 PM

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/Q42...ndcompactgroup/

"It wasn't so long ago that DSLRs were out of financial reach for most enthusiast photographers. Back before DSLRs fell below the magic sub-$1000 mark, the only way for most people to 'go digital' was to invest in a high-quality compact, offering SLR-like control, but without the expensive extras - the large sensor and interchangeable lens mount."

Well, here is another look at a trio of compact cameras; this time the Canon S95 is present instead of the G12; I wonder where is the Samsung EX-1 though? It pretty much has the same conclusion as the last one I posted: Image quality is not an issue with modern compacts, and one should choose based on their needs and wants instead. Want something wider? Pick the LX5. Want something small? Pick the S95. Want something fast and works like a professional-grade camera? Don't pick the P7000. Hit the link for the full article.


Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Premium Compact Shootout: Nikon vs Canon vs Panasonic

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 12:00 PM

http://bythom.com/compactHQ1.htm

"We're now almost two decades into the competent digital compact camera era, but many things remain the same. The big issue has been and remains the small size of the image sensor in these cameras. While there has been a strong increase in image quality over the years, the small sensor sized used just doesn't allow the high-end compact camera to produce DSLR-like results in dynamic range or high ISO shooting."

Thom Hogan has compared three premium compacts, the Nikon P7000, the Canon G12, and the Panasonic LX5. While I am certain they all are decent (Nikon surprises me somewhat), I still like the Panasonic's combination of size, focal length, and looks. It is a very charming camera, the LX5. On another note: The Nikon looks way too much like a Canon; Thom Hogan even notes that the operation is more Canon than Nikon-like. If so, what is the appeal of buying a P7000 when there is a G12? Nikon really should have worked harder on differentiating the product (plus a compact that works like a Nikon DSLR is worth extra points in my book).


Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Canon EOS 60D Reviewed by Digital Photography Review

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 04:03 PM

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canoneos60d/

"With the 60D Canon has unashamedly moved the X0D range out of the 'semi pro' bracket and instead focused on the enthusiast photographer looking to upgrade from their Rebel. As a result, it's not the obvious continuation of the 30D - 40D - 50D pattern that its naming might suggest. Instead it sits pretty well precisely in the same market position as was once-upon-a-time occupied by the 'Elan' series of 35mm film SLRs (which in Europe were not-so-coincidentally given double-digit model numbers)."

Despite the doom and gloom behind the 60D's downgrade, DPReview found it a pretty compelling camera, especially those looking to upgrade from a 550D and not wanting to spend too much. I know a couple of people who'd have been pleased if this came out when they were looking to upgrade!


Friday, November 5, 2010

Hey Scanner Companies, Here's An Opportunity For You

Posted by Jason Dunn in "Digital Home Talk" @ 07:00 AM

I've owned a flatbed scanner for as long as I can remember; I think my first one was in the mid-'90s, a Mustek if memory serves. It was a tank of a scanner, but for the time, it did a pretty good job. Before that, I owned a grey-scale hand scanner - anyone remember those? You'd have to slowly, and steadily, drag it over the object you wanted to scan. If you twitched, you'd screw up the scan. Now, in 2010, even though I have a multi-function printer/scanner/fax machine, I still own a dedicated flatbed scanner - an HP Scanjet G4050 - because quality scanning is important to me. Read more...


Wednesday, October 27, 2010

DigitalRev Engages in More Tomfoolery; Sticks Expensive Lens on Cheap Camera and Vice-versa

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Articles & Resources" @ 01:00 PM

http://www.digitalrev.com/en/pro-ds...ns-6943-article

"We got sent a question asking us: What would be better? A pro DSLR with a cheapo lens or a cheapo DSLR with an expensive lens? Well, we thought we'd answer that question in this video by asking two very different photographers to show us what they're like. We tested the Canon 1D Mark IV with a Sigma 28-300mm f/something and a Canon 550D with a 24-70mm f/2.8L. What produces better results? Watch the video to find out."

*sigh* The real answer to that question is, budget on what you can afford for a base system (camera plus a lens or a few lenses and accessories), then add lenses (again, that you can afford) as you go along. I really dislike these questions; I see them all too often, and they are usually connected to the idea of having the latest and the greatest to show off with.

So in the above situation, the best thing to do would buy a 7D with a 17-55/2.8 IS USM and start taking photos.


Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Digital Camera Resource Page Reviews the Canon Powershot G12

Posted by Lee Yuan Sheng in "Digital Home Hardware & Accessories" @ 07:00 AM

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/c...shot_g12-review

"The PowerShot G12 ($499) is the latest model in Canon's flagship G-series of digital cameras. It's a relatively minor update to the PowerShot G11..."

The Canon G12 is an incremental update, but I do like the addition of a proper command dial to it. I do wish the lens was a bit faster though! Digital Camera Resource Page has a good review, and it doesn't disappoint if you're looking for this class of camera.


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